Math and Computer Science Courses

Computer Science
CS 105. Web Page Design I
This first programming class introduces the HTML language for creating home pages on the Internet. Students will also complete a project applying HTML. This class is designed for all majors.

CS 110. Introduction to Computer Science
Designed for computer science majors and non-majors with little or no prior introduction to computing and programming, this course introduces the basics of programming and problem solving. Students will learn the fundamental concepts of a structured programming language and will learn to solve problems using logic and good program design. Other topics include alternative programming paradigms, compiler concepts, history of computing, number systems, and the Linux operating system.

CS 111. Computer Science I
An introduction to programming and problem solving using a high-level programming language. Emphasis will be on program design, algorithm development and good programming habits and techniques. The characteristics and organization of modern digital computers are also studied. Prerequisite: CS 110 or instructor permission.

CS 112. Computer Science II
A continuation of CS 111. Students will continue their study of the high-level language studied in CS 111. Continued emphasis on program design, algorithm development and good programming habits and techniques. Students will write programs that are more challenging and complex than those written in CS 111. Prerequisite CS 111.

CS 200. Computer Applications for Education
The purpose of this course is to provide knowledge and skills which will equip teachers to use computing technology effectively in the classroom. Prerequisite or co-requisite: ED 205.

CS 205. Web Page Design II
Further studies including site planning, page design for various browsers, image mapping and style sheets. Advanced HTML for frames, graphics and animated GIFs are covered along with an introduction to Javascript. Prerequisite: CS 105.

CS 220. Data Structures
Sorting, searching, linked lists, stacks, queues, and trees. Prerequisite: CS 111.

CS 221. Computer Organization
Covers computer organization in a bottom-up fashion. Topics include number systems, binary arithmetic, Boolean algebra, digital logic design, combinational and sequential circuits, registers, processor components, program control, assembly language programming, microprogramming, and stored programs. Prerequisites: CS 112, MTH 217 or permission of instructor .

CS 229. Computer Support
Computer hardware and LAN hardware are covered. Peripherals and hardware installation and help-desk support are also included. Students participate in a complete network installation and setup. Prerequisite/corequisite: BA 202 or permission of instructor.

CS 230. System Administration
This course will provide the student with an overview of the Linux Operating System and the fundamentals to properly manage a UNIX-based environment. Topics of discussion include: history of UNIX and Linux, file systems, users, devices, hardware management, network functionality, and operating a secure system. This course will also cover basic scripting languages and show how they can be used to manage a UNIX-like system. Prerequisite: CS 111.

CS 250. Introduction to Geographic Information Systems
An introduction to the theory and practice of analysis of spatial information using the technology of geographic information systems (GIS). There is an emphasis on hands-on learning using GIS software, hard copy maps, and data from several disciplines. Laboratory. Prerequisites: MTH 113 or MTH 115, CS 200 or BA 202, or permission of instructor.

CS 253. Multimedia I
Multimedia applications which focus on the creation of presentations via desktop publishing and slide generating software. Computer graphic images and their manipulation are introduced.

CS 261. Internship
An initial outside-the-classroom experience. Time will be spent in support of the campus technology infrastructure and support system. Prerequisite: CS 229 and Sophomore standing.

CS 302. Systems Analysis and Design
An introduction to the systems development life cycle, analysis of business functions, utilization of project management tools for analysis and systems design, and strategies for systems design and implementation. Students participate in team projects, class interaction, and the design and creation of a simulated application. Prerequisite/Corequisite: CS 315, CS 253 or permission of instructor.

CS 303. Systems Design and Implementation
A continuation of CS 302 with an emphasis on design and implementation. Students complete the team design project initiated in CS 302. Prerequisite: CS 302.

CS 305. Programming for the World Wide Web
Topics include CGI interfaces, web site creation, security, transaction processing, managing an intranet or internet presence for an organization, and content preparation tools. Prerequisites: CS 111, CS 205, and CS 253 or permission of instructor.

CS 307. Data Communications
Data communications across all communications technology is included. Networks, both LAN and WAN, are covered along with EDI standards such as: ANSI, EDIFACT, and HL7. The OSI model is explored. Intranets and the Internet are also discussed. Prerequisite: CS 111.

CS 315. Database Management Systems
The fundamental concepts of DBMS, DBMS organizations and their capabilities, general database theory and implementation techniques. Students will design and create a database using MS-ACCESS as a team project. Prerequisite: CS 111.

CS 321. Advanced Programming I
An in-depth study of a modern, high-level, object-oriented programming language. Emphasis will be on practical application of concepts learned in CS 111, CS 112, and CS 220. There will be continued emphasis on good program design, algorithm development and good programming habits and techniques. Graphical user interfaces will also be introduced, as well as programming using an integrated developer environment. Prerequisite: CS 220.

CS 322. Advanced Programming II
A continuation of the in-depth study of a modern, high-level, object-oriented programming language. Emphasis will be on practical application of concepts learned in CS 111, CS 112, CS 220, and CS 321. There will be continued emphasis on good program design, algorithm development and good programming habits and techniques. Graphical user interfaces will also be studied in greater depth. Prerequisite: CS 321.

CS 327, 328, 329. Special Topics
Options for students to study, according to their interest, a variety of topics not covered in regular courses. To be announced by the department. Prerequisite: varies depending upon topic. Departmental approval required.

CS 330. Operating Systems
This course provides an introduction to operating systems including their concepts, design, and implementation. Topics include process management, storage and memory management, I/O, distributed systems, and security. The class will also include some systems programming projects. Prerequisites: CS 220, CS 221.

CS 340. Theory of Computation
This course presents the theoretical foundations of computing. Topics include finite automata, regular sets, push-down automata, context-free languages, Turing machines, and language hierarchy. Other topics may include an introduction to countability, diagonalization, and undecidability as time permits. Prerequisites: CS 220, CS 221, MTH 217.

CS 421. Software Design
This course will build on the programming language taught in CS 321 and CS 322. Rather than a study of the language itself, these courses will focus on the design aspect of programming. In this course students will engage in the team development of several large software projects, learning common design methodologies, and using team design tools in the process. Prerequisites: CS 321, CS 322.

CS 450. Seminar
Presentation of oral reports and discussion of topics in computer science. Departmental approval and Senior standing required.

CS 457, 458. Directed Readings
Independent readings directed by members of the department faculty. Departmental approval required.

CS 460. Independent Study
Independent in-depth investigation, reading, and research in a professional area of interest. Departmental approval required.

CS 461. Professional Internship
A student/agency-originated and departmentally approved field learning experience which enables the student to apply previously attained knowledge and skills. Senior standing required.

Mathematics
MTH 101. Basic Mathematics
Intermediate algebra and computation skills with applications in statistics, probability, geometry, trigonometry, and logic. Emphasis on problem-solving technique and extensive use of graphic calculators. Students already possessing these skills may demonstrate competence without taking this course. *Does NOT meet General Education requirement for mathematics.

MTH 107. Finite Mathematics
Selected topics including an introduction to descriptive statistics, collecting and interpreting data, finite probability and logical reasoning. Prerequisite: MTH 101 or a rating of 2 on the APT.

MTH 113. Precalculus
Fundamentals of algebraic and trigonometric functions and their applications. Intended to prepare students for Math 115, Calculus I. Prerequisite: Rating of 2 on APT. Does not meet general education requirement for mathematics.

MTH 115. Calculus I
Fundamentals of calculus including limits, continuity, differentiation, and integration. Prerequisite: MTH 113 or a rating of 3 on the APT.

MTH 116. Elementary Probability and Statistics
An introduction to the ideas and application of probability and statistics. This course is designed especially for students interested in natural science, social science, or business. Prerequisite: MTH 115.

MTH 120. Calculus II
A continuation of Math 115 with emphasis on techniques of integration, vector calculus, partial differentiation, and multiple integrals. Prerequisite: MTH 115.

MTH 203. Elementary Geometry
Geometric figures, measurement, transformations, and constructions. Prerequisite: MTH 107 or 115.

MTH 204. Teaching Number Systems
Patterns and reasoning in problem solving, the real number operations, elementary number theory, numeration systems, teaching methods, and consumer language. Prerequisite: MTH 107 or 115.

MTH 210. Math of Finance
Mathematical applications with topics from: payroll, mathematics of buying, markdown and inventory control, simple interest, depreciation, financial statements and ratios, problem solving and personal finance. Prerequisite: MTH 107 or 115

MTH 217. Discrete Mathematics
Designed to introduce students to mathematical thinking using topics in discrete mathematics. Content includes sets, functions, logic and logic circuits, relations, combinatorics, and graph theory. Prerequisite: MTH 115.

MTH 218. Applied Linear Algebra
Matrices, determinants, vector spaces, linear transformations, eigenvalues, and eigenvectors. Prerequisite: MTH 115.

MTH 220. Calculus III
A rigorous development of calculus including limits, continuity, differentiation, integration, sequences, and series. Prerequisite: MTH 120.

MTH 261. Internship
An initial outside-the-classroom experience enabling students to explore new areas or to supplement regular courses. Department approval required.

MTH 316. Statistical Methods II
Multiple regressions, analysis of variance, factorial experimentation. Prerequisite: MTH 116.

MTH 323. Advanced Calculus I
Topics include elementary topology, continuity, uniform continuity, differentiation and integration. Prerequisite: MTH 220.

MTH 324. Advanced Calculus II
Topics include series, uniform convergence, transformations, and vector calculus. Prerequisite: MTH 323.

MTH 325. Complex Variables
Topics include the algebra and topology of complex numbers, analytic functions, complex integration, and residue theory. Prerequisite: MTH 217.

MTH 327, MTH 328. Special Topics
Options for students to study, according to their interests, a variety of topics not covered in regular courses. To be announced by the department.

MTH 329. Foundations of Geometry
Euclidean, spherical, and hyperbolic geometry with emphasis on the rigorous axiomatic development of geometry. Prerequisite: MTH 120.

MTH 331. Introduction to Abstract Algebra
An introduction to the theory of groups, rings, and fields and other algebraic structures. Prerequisite: MTH 217.

MTH 332. Abstract Algebra II
Continuation of Math 331, with special emphasis on linear algebra. Prerequisite: MTH 331.

MTH 335. Introduction to the Theory of Numbers
Topics usually include prime numbers, linear and quadratic congruencies, and diophantine equations. Prerequisite: MTH 217.

MTH 337. Differential Equations
Theory and applications of ordinary differential equations. Prerequisite: MTH 120.

MTH 341. Probability Theory
Topics include axiomatic development of probability, conditional probability, combinatorial theory, random variables, expectation, certain discrete and continuous distributions, functions of random variables, jointly distributed random variables, and limit theorems, Prerequisite: MTH 220.

MTH 342. Mathematical Statistics
Topics include estimation, hypothesis testing, linear models, the analysis of variance, analysis of enumerative data, and nonparametric statistics. Prerequisite: MTH 341.

MTH 350. Mathematical Exploration
This course is a preparation for the capstone course (MTH 450), and focuses on the process of concept development in mathematics. Prerequisites: MTH 217, MTH 220.

MTH 450. Senior Seminar
The student will study an undergraduate level mathematical topic and produce a paper on this topic. The paper will include original examples, problem sets and will illustrate the concept development process in mathematics. An oral presentation of the paper will be required. Prerequisite: MTH 350.

MTH 457, 458. Directed Readings
Independent readings directed by members of the department faculty.

MTH 460. Independent Study
Independent in-depth investigation, reading, and research in a professional area of interest. Department approval required.