Anjelika Kidd, MHU '15, Bachelor of Science, has been offered and accepted an assistantship to pursue a M.S. at the University of Georgia in Forest Resources, where she will be studying White Ibis populations in southern Florida and their relationship with urban areas.

Anje Kidd Birding Internship Story
Banding my first bird (Tennessee Warbler) with my supervisor Mark Hopey, Director, Big Bald Banding Station. - Anjelia Kidd, MHU'15.

Anje says of the internship she completed as a science major at Mars Hill: "This experience not only taught me about the world of field biology and conservation, but also about my passions, my future, and myself."

"When I first came to Mars Hill, I knew that I wanted to work with animals, but I wasn’t sure how I would go about doing it. I only knew that I loved animals, the forest, and learning. During my Junior year, I was in a Conservation Biology class with Dr. Scott Pearson and he took us to visit Big Bald Banding Station. While there, I asked them if I could come up the mountain to fulfill some hours for my Montgomery Scholarship. I went up with Dr. Pearson a few times, and then started going on my own. Having enjoyed the experience, I returned the next season to complete an internship."

Bitten and yelled at: "Despite being stuck on top of a mountain during a storm, losing feeling of my toes during cold, wet mornings, and getting bitten and yelled at by numerous birds, I found something that incorporated all of my passions and something that I truly enjoyed. Each day was an adventure with its own trials and rewards. This experience not only taught me about the world of field biology and conservation, but also about my passions, my future, and myself. Through this internship, I was able to cultivate my personal interests, pursuing my own research project and building a career path toward research and field biology.

Not everyone is a field biologist, but I think the best way to figure out what you want to do is to try it out. Examine your passions, look for connections between them, network with others to find options to explore, and get out there and do it."

Get active:

"Too many people pursue a career path only to find out that it is a life they do not enjoy. I was a librarian once, and learned that I do not want to work in a library ever again. In my life, I have found that the best way to find my path is to be open-minded, to embrace opportunities that come my way, and to get active. Make plans, but make them flexible. Sometimes the greatest opportunities come from doors you haven’t thought to open.

"Since graduation in May, I have explored several different options. Over the last few days, I have been offered and accepted an assistantship to pursue a M.S. at the University of Georgia in Forest Resources. I will be studying White Ibis populations in southern Florida and their relationship with urban areas. "

-Gill Bosonetto, Director of Career Development Services, MHU, May 2015.